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Questions about Sub Kick

WHY IS IT GOING FORWARD TO THE CASH BOX?

The theory is this:

The classic microphones for the case, pick up certain frequencies depending on the models. They designed especially for capturing even the low frequencies, but despite being able to capture data as the low frequencies up to 20 Hz, they often have difficulty doing so.

According to the principle I explained above, it was decided to use a sub kick in pairs with a normal microphone.

WHY TOGETHER WITH A MICROPHONE?

Obviously it is not possible to get the clean sound of a beautiful microphone, because due to its size, an important air mass is required to vibrate the speaker membrane. For this reason, if we used to sing, it would not be possible to capture high and medium frequencies, but low maybe you.

So to have a wide range of frequencies it is used in pairs with a microphone.

It seems that the Yamaha Sub kick, for example, has the best performance when paired with the Shure Beta 52.

BUT IS THAT REALLY SO?

Here the speech becomes a little more interesting and less romantic.

It’s all nice what I’ve written so far, but in reality, there are a lot of rumors that go a little against the official versions (read so far).

I state that I report them for completeness, to you the final judgment.

According to some authoritative technicians in the sector, the speaker would not actually be able to pick up frequencies that a conventional microphone cannot pick up. In fact, if you read the technical data sheets of the AKG D112 MKII and the Shure Beta 52, which are two of the most widely used microphones for the case and not too expensive, in theory they cover a frequency range up to 20 Hz. I would say very interesting considering that the keynote of a battery case is in the region between 60 and 90 Hz, therefore within the range of a conventional microphone.

Many argue that the size of the microphone diaphragm is irrelevant when it comes to the LF response (it can affect the HF response instead). The reason is that a microphone works like a pressure detector by detecting air pressure at a point in space.

Without going into too much detail (I refer you to the technical datasheets for more details), the low frequencies ” captured ” by the Sub kick, would not be frequencies that unlike a normal microphone this system manages to capture, but a ” decadent oscillation ” that generates an extended low-frequency signal, exchanged for lost mystic frequencies .

SO IS IT NOT MY CASE THAT HAS THAT SOUND?

Technically not. At least according to these sound engineers.

It would, therefore, be a fake sound, it is not your case that emits those frequencies.

In reality, the Sub kick output signal would not be related to the harmonic structure of the case but a resonance characteristic of the speaker due to the diaphragm that cannot return to its rest position without swinging back and forth.

Now it happens that the size and natural resonance of the NS10 case is very well integrated with the fundamental of the bass drum, offering a very interesting low-end tail.

Having said that, according to these technicians it is perfectly fine to use it, as it perfectly completes the sound of the case, but it is not necessary to have the idea of ​​being capturing something real that escapes the other microphones.

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